For best browser experience please use Firefox or Chrome. ×

Shop the source

Directly from Thailand's leading brands and artisans

Already a member? Sign in

Tum-Klong Village, Ang Thong Province

Khak Drum

bySanan Buakli, maker of Khak drums

Mr Sanan is one of those rare breeds of teachers who freely shares his knowledge and techniques to his apprentices. He thinks drum-making is a kind of folk knowledge that deserves to be continued. In his own words, "I don't want this valuable knowledge to disappear from Thai society."

Mr Sanan's Khak drums are smaller than ordinary drums and produce a sound distinct from other Khak drums. The drum heads are made from cowhides, softened by soaking in water for 12 hours.

Muang District, Chiang Mai Province

Thai Three-String Lute

byBoonyarat Tippayarat, maker of THAI three-string lutes

Mr Boonyarat continues the tradition of making this musical instrument in order to keep it alive for the Thai people.

The production process begins with cutting a coconut shell, edges intact, into three sections. The shells are then boiled in vegetable oil for two hours at 180℃. Using something called a Sanka-Lok ceramic mold, the shells are molded and forged at 1200℃. After that, they are sun-dried and assembled together with the wooden parts of the lute before cowhides are attached.

Muang District, Lampoon Province

Yok Dok Silk

byPichet Kaewwansa, weaver of Yok Dok silk

Yok Dok silk is a traditional fabric that requires special weaving techniques using a tool called Ta-gor to create complex but delicate 3D patterns. Yok Dok silk, which originates from the Lampoon province, showcases the skillful hand technique in the craft of silk weaving.

 

Muang District, Samutsakorn Province

Chalom Boat Model

byThongchai Saisangchan, maker of Chalom model junkboats

Artisans like Mr Thongchai are preserving the art of making model junkboats as a reminder to the new generation that these martime vessels used to be a key part of the country's history and culture. The conservation of this art is considered to be of utmost importance.

Chalom boats are made hewing closely to the anatomy of real junks. In making these, the most challenging parts are the head and tail.

Muang District, Chantaburi Province

Chantaboon Mat

byJurairat Sappasook, maker of Chantaboon mats

Ms Jurairat Sappasok is a proud maker of Chantaboon mats, a product native to Chantaburi province. The mats are made from brackish papyrus leaves, and are well-known for their beauty, comfort, and durability.

To create a mat, the papyrus leaf is cut into four pieces; the inner part of the leaf is removed to prevent humidity and fungus. Brackish papyrus is naturally white, but can be dyed to create the colours integral to contemporary designs. The pattern is written on the paper first, then weaved with jute threads on the mat itself.

Wat Ket Sub-District, Chiang Mai Province

Papercutting

byBenjapon Sidhipraneet,master paper-cutter

Papercutting is a local tradition passed down through generations, and this is what Mr Benjapon devotes himself to in order to keep this national heritage alive.

The craft can be seen in every region of Thailand but with varying techniques and designs. The core of the craft is the skill in using scissors and handling the paper during the cutting process - both of which play a significant role in creating proper curves on the finished product.

Kum Muang District, Kalasinthu Province

Mud Mee Silk

bySongkram Ngamying, weaver of Mud Mee silk

In every element of Thai wisdom, there are hidden values in the field of tradition, culture and belief. The same applies to weaving. On the surface, we won't see anything, but take a closer look and we will see how weaving reflect Thai people's way of life.

The pattern-making for Mud Mee silk starts with creating a colorful design by adapting the color theory through the dyeing process. Mud Mee silk's distinct feature is achieved by completely avoiding the opposite color of the hue being used to create a totally smoother tone.

Kratoomban District, Samutsakorn Province

Benjarong Ceramics

byThawee Pansri

Mr Thawee has spent half of his life learning about Benjarong ceramics since the knowledge surrounding this craft is practically limitless. He is now a part of the project that aims to pass down new knowledge and experiences to those interested in the art of Benjarong before this cultural tradition disappears.

Making Benjarong ceramics is an art that requires various qualities, such as creativity, honesty, patience, and love for the craft.

Bang Lane District, Nakon Pathom Province

Pearl Craft

byJukkit Suksawat, abalone pearl craftsman

Mr Jukkit dedicates time and effort to impart his knowledge of this intricate art form to the younger generaton and to help conserve this cultural heritage.

The craft process begins with cutting the shell into pieces before they are painstakingly attached to the object. The shell pieces are finished with natural Chinese lacquer to make them shiny.

Koke Charoen District, Lopburi Province

Mud Mee Silk

byWinai Pudchim

In every element of Thai wisdom, there are hidden values in the field of tradition, culture and belief. The same applies to weaving. On the surface, we won't see anything, but take a closer look and we will see how weaving reflect Thai people's way of life.

The pattern-making for Mud Mee silk starts with creating a colorful design by adapting the color theory through the dyeing process. Mud Mee silk's distinct feature is achieved by completely avoiding the opposite color of the hue being used to create a totally smoother tone.

Baan Mae Sub-District, Sun Pathong District, Chiang Mai

Wood Carving

byJane Nualsupha

From a carver to a 3D wood sculpture conservationist, Mr Jane only hopes to promote the art of carving to the new generation.

To fashion this masterpiece, a chalk is used to create outlines in the wood − a pencil is used for the more intricate details − then the carving begins. The most popular wood used for carvings are those that people believe would bring luck. Meanwhile, the popular patterns include wild elephants and patterns derived from traditional Thai folklores.

Potharam District, Rachaburi Province

Wat Kanon Thai Traditional Shadow Puppet

byChalan Thawornnukulphong, maker of Wat Kanon traditional shadow puppet

Mr Chalan's love for art led him to purse studies at a craftsmen institution, during which his thesis revolved around Thai shadow puppets. He dedicates time and effort to help continue this tradition and to pass the knowledge to the next generation.

Wat Kanon is a Thai traditional shadow puppet art characterised by the puppets' distinctive designs. Each puppet consists of a single character set against an intricate background of swirls and other motifs. The only colors used are red, black, and green.

NEW TO ONENOW?

Subscribe to our newsletter and get a $10 welcome pack

Please enter a valid email address.You email address is already registered.

THANK YOU FOR SUBSCRIBING

Take USD$10 OFF your first purchase

USE CODE:
SAWASDEE

or

Register Now

to receive exclusive
member-only promotions, private sales and more!